Diversity Woman Magazine

FAL 2018

Leadership and Executive Development for women of all races, cultures and backgrounds

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d i v e r s i t y w o m a n . c o m Fa l l 2 0 1 8 D I V E R S I T Y W O M A N 25 We Mean Business > By Jackie Krentzman W hen Jennifer Lov- ing was growing up in Southern California in the 1970s and '80s, her uncle was a "fire-and- brimstone" minister. He ran a church in Venice Beach that served as a haven for the many homeless people who flocked there. "He took in anybody who needed a place to stay, no questions asked," says Loving, who today is the CEO of Des- tination: Home, an affordable-housing nonprofit for homeless people in Sili- con Valley. "So I grew up thinking that if someone needed a place to live, the logical thing to do is make that happen." Today, Loving is making that happen in a big way. She has led the countywide charge to build supportive housing for many of the more than 7,000 homeless people in Santa Clara County, right in the heart of Silicon Valley. Destination: Home is a convener of supportive-hous- ing nonprofits, government officials, and the private sector, which work to- gether to create permanent housing for the homeless. Since 2015, Santa Clara County, in large part because of Desti- nation: Home, has housed more than 5,000 formerly homeless people. Loving, who is impassioned, relentless, and strategic, has built these public-private partnerships both through her force-of- nature direct appeals and through her commitment to a collective impact the- ory of change. Her persistence and vi- sion are paying off. In March, Cisco gave Destination: Home one of the largest grants ever to a homeless organization: $50 million. Not in My Backyard Loving saw lots of dollars being wasted on trying to solve homelessness—much of the waste due to lack of coordination among the different entities working on the problem—and realized the answer was a public-private partnership, with nonprof- its, the tech sector, and city and county gov- ernments working together to tackle what is perhaps the most vexing issue facing the greater San Francisco Bay Area today. Leading for Good Nonprofit CEO Jennifer Loving has developed relationships with tech companies to take on Silicon Valley's most vexing issue—homelessness

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